Vaccine passports protesters marched in Nova Scotia Legislature

In Halifax, demonstrators are coming to oppose Nova Scotia vaccine passports.

Some participants say that vaccine passports violate basic liberties.

Some 100 people met to protest the vaccine passport system COVID-19 in Nova Scotia in downtown Halifax.

Liberal Leader Iain Rankin has recently announced the introduction of vaccine passport, known as ScotiaPass, by a re-elected Liberal government.

This week in Canada, Quebec was the first province to introduce the comprehensive passport system of vaccines.

Vaccine passports protesters marched in Nova Scotia Legislature
On Saturday protesters marched down to Barrington Street from Grand Parade Square and on the way to the new parliamentary term in Nova Scotia.

And the Government of Canada announced on Friday that it must vaccinate all the public officials.

Protestors were holding signs and chanting 'Not ScotiaPass' as they went down Barrington Street from Grand Parade and down to Nova Scotia.

Val Henneberry, participant, said that she came to the march for her liberty.

"Every day we are increasingly losing all our freedoms.... People have to choose what's going on in their bodies, "Henneberry said that, while a speaker was playing George Michael's song Freedom.

"We take away freedom of choice and in a supposedly democratic society, I simply don't think that's correct."

He said it was against the Canadian Constitution and human rights that Henneberry believed Scotia Pass was against it.

On Saturday, demonstrators gathered at Halifax's Grand Parade to oppose Liberals' plan to introduce a vaccination passport system on Tuesday, when reelected.
On Saturday, demonstrators gathered at Halifax's Grand Parade to oppose Liberals' plan to introduce a vaccination passport system on Tuesday, when reelected.

Gary Burrill and Tim Houston, the progressive leader of the Conservatives, did not commit to a vaccine passport system. They said that if their parties are governmental, they must consult with public health.

Leader Jonathan Dean of the New Scotia Atlantica Party said his party is against a passenger vaccine system, attending the march.

"There is no [COVID-19] to it, there are no vaccine-related issues, there are fundamental rights of people to decide for them and their families on their own health," he said.