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Teachers strike protest Sydney and melbourne nsw, pay scale salary 2022

During the first teachers' strike in that city in 25 years, a lot of people show up.

Teachers in public and private schools in NSW are on strike for 24 hours because of pay and a lack of staff.

In the first strike of its kind in 25 years, thousands of public and Catholic schools in NSW are on strike for 24 hours.

Teachers marched in Sydney's central business district on Thursday because they were upset that the NSW budget only gave them a 3 cent pay raise this year and said that they might get a 3.5 percent raise next year.

It is the third strike in six months called by the 85,000 teachers who are part of the NSW Teachers Federation or the Independent Education Union NSW/ACT.

Teachers strike protest Sydney and melbourne nsw, pay scale salary 2022
Teachers in public and private schools in NSW are on strike for 24 hours because of pay and a lack of staff.

But this is the first time in more than 25 years that both unions have gone on a 24-hour strike together.

About a million families are likely to be affected by the strike, which comes just one day before a two-week school break.

Angelo Gavrielatos, president of the NSW Teachers Federation, said on Wednesday that there is a crisis in the form of a lack of teachers, and that the government is to blame.

"The government has known for years that low wages and too much work are to blame for this crisis."

The strikers have been holding rallies with the slogan "More Than Thanks." They want to be paid for the work that has been praised.

On their signs, protesters wrote things like "Thanks won't buy lettuce" and "An apple a day doesn't pay the rent."

Sarah Mitchell, who is in charge of education, is upset by the decision to go on strike and says it is a political move.

Most schools will have at least a little bit of supervision, but some will be closed for the day.

Mitchell defended the government's pay policy for the public sector, saying it was the best in the country.

Teachers are still protesting outside of Sydney's central business district (CBD). Tens of thousands of teachers are also protesting in places like Wollongong and Tweed Heads.

A week of strikes

Rail workers' strikes are still causing problems in the city because they affect how often trains run.

The rail union says its strike will go on this week, even though Transport Minister David Elliott said he would spend $264 million to make safety changes to a fleet of Korean-made trains.

The Rail, Tram, and Bus Union has been fighting with the government for a long time over the changes.

Alex Claassens, the secretary of the RTBU, said that before any action is called off, the union wants to see the whole package and commitment in writing and talk about it with its members.

Mr. Claassens said, "Rail workers and commuters have been burned too many times to believe what one minister says in one meeting."

CEO of Sydney Trains Matt Longland said that the network was running with fewer trains than usual, which was like a weekend schedule.

He told people who take the train to work to stay home or give themselves more time because trains will run less often and be more crowded.

On Tuesday, the rail union began a strike by slowing trains down to 60 km/h.

During peak times on Friday, speeds will be slowed down by 70%.

Check here to see if your trains will be affected.

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