Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Sheldon Silver prison news dies obituary, death net worth wife

Sheldon Silver prison news dies obituary, death net worth wife
Silver, the former leader of the New York State Assembly, died on Monday, his former chief of staff said. His career was ruined in 2015 when he was found guilty of corruption.
Sheldon Silver, a New York power broker who was found guilty of corruption, died at the age of 77.

For years, he was a powerful figure in New York politics, but when he was in prison, he passed away.

Sheldon Silver, the once-invincible leader of the New York State Assembly who was convicted of corruption in 2015, died on Monday. The man was 77.

Silver was being held at the Devens Federal Medical Center in Ayer, Massachusetts. Judith Rapfogel, his former chief of staff, said that Silver had been there. One of the federal prison spokeswomen said that Silver had died at the Nashoba Valley Medical Center, which is close to where he was being held.

In 2020, Silver's lawyers said that he had a history of cancer and chronic kidney disease. The cause of death wasn't known right away.

As a Democrat from the Lower East Side, Mr. Silver rose to power in 1976, when he was elected to Congress. He was known as a master of Albany's labyrinths of power, and he was speaker of the Assembly for two decades from 1994 to 2015.

Silver was soft-spoken and hard to understand in his public statements and Capitol corridor interviews, but he still had a lot of power. He was able to push for things like raising the minimum wage and building more affordable housing. When he worked with six mayors and governors, from Hugh L. Carey to Andrew M. Cuomo, he was also able to stop them from pursuing their own goals. This included a stadium on the West Side of Manhattan.

Mr. Silver was accused in early 2015 of taking nearly $4 million in illegal payments in exchange for taking official actions for a cancer researcher at Columbia University and two real estate developers. That led to him losing his power.

In a Lower Manhattan park near the East River, Mr. Silver and Edward I. Koch were together when Mr. Koch was a US representative from New York, which is where Mr. Silver is from.
In a Lower Manhattan park near the East River, Mr. Silver and Edward I. Koch were together when Mr. Koch was a US representative from New York, which is where Mr. Silver is from.

Mr. Silver was found guilty of federal corruption charges in late 2015. He was able to successfully appeal that conviction, which led to the conviction being overturned in 2017. This happened again in 2018. There was also a second trial, and the person was found guilty again. For the next six and a half years, Mr. Silver kept out of jail. His legal maneuvers came to an end in 2020, leaving him to serve the sentence.

The coronavirus pandemic forced Mr. Silver to be let out of prison for a short time in the spring. He was sent back to prison two days after a public outcry.

On Monday, longtime former colleagues of Silver tried to figure out how to make sense of what happened to him and what they saw as his achievements over the past 20 years as the leader of the Assembly. They said he was a strong supporter of New York City's priorities, especially after 9/11.

"Shelly Silver was one of the most powerful advocates for progressive issues in the New York State Legislature," said Assemblyman Richard Gottfried, a Democrat from Manhattan, citing Mr. Silver's record on civil liberties issues, reproductive rights, and same-sex marriage as examples of how he pushed for these issues in the legislature. He said: "It's a shame that his good work has been overshadowed by his crimes."

A lot of deals in Albany had been done by "three men in a room," which were usually the governor, the speaker of the Assembly, and the Senate leader. Silver's downfall and that of his Republican counterpart, Dean G. Skelos, signaled a new balance of power in Albany, where most deals had been done by "three men in a room."

His office in Albany, New York. This is where Mr. Silver worked as the Assembly speaker back in 2010.
His office in Albany, New York. This is where Mr. Silver worked as the Assembly speaker back in 2010.

Indeed, Carl E. Heastie, a Bronx Democrat who is also the first black speaker of the Assembly, has been seen as more of a consensus builder than Mr. Silver. History has also put a stop to the idea that "three men" make important decisions. Now, the governor and leader of the State Senate are both women.

A working-class neighborhood called the Lower East Side is where Sheldon Silver was born on February 13, 1944. This neighborhood helped shape both his political beliefs and where he could get money and power in New York City. They came from Russia, and his dad was in charge of a hardware store. Former New York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo and other politicians who grew up in New York City shared a love for basketball, which he played on public courts in the city.

He went to Brooklyn Law School and became a lawyer. In 1976, he ran for Assembly, defeating a Republican, Leonard Wertheim, and joining a chamber that now includes Chuck Schumer, the state's top senator. Mr. Silver rose through the ranks, eventually becoming chairman of the Codes Committee, which is in charge of criminal law. At the same time, he kept working as a lawyer, which led to his corruption conviction.

Early victories in politics show that he was good at legislating and had a strong religious faith: An Orthodox Jew, he helped pass a law in 1983 that removed religious barriers to remarriage for Jewish women who had to get a "get," or Jewish divorce decree, from their husbands before they could remarry. This was against traditional Jewish law. He also helped to stop autopsies when they were against religious beliefs and there was "no compelling public need," according to his Assembly biography.

With the Republican leader Dean G. Skelos and the governor of New York at his side in 2014. A lot of people called them "three men in a room" when they came together to make legislative deals.
With the Republican leader Dean G. Skelos and the governor of New York at his side in 2014. A lot of people called them "three men in a room" when they came together to make legislative deals.

He leaves behind his wife Rosa and four children: Edward, Esther, Janine, and Michelle, as well as a few grandchildren.

During Saul Weprin's term as speaker back in 1994, his rise to the top came through tragedy. Weprin died from complications from a stroke. As interim speaker, Mr. Silver got the job with the help of other New York City Democrats, who have a lot of power in the Assembly.

It took a good negotiator to work with the State Senate when it was run by Republicans, says Joseph R. Lentol, a former Democratic Party assemblyman from Brooklyn who used to work in the State House. During the early 1990s, Mr. Silver played a big role in getting money from the state to hire more police officers in the city, clean up Times Square, and start "the renaissance of New York City," he said.

Lentol said that Silver "could work things out." Silver worked for 12 years under Gov. George E. Pataki, who was a three-term Republican.

Some Democrats from upstate revolted against Silver on the Assembly floor in 2000. They didn't like how he was running the state, and Silver was forced to step down. The attempt to overthrow Mr. Silver failed, but it hurt him politically and made public an intraparty power struggle that would have been kept quiet in the Capitol.

In 1997, Mr. Silver was part of a rally in front of the Capitol with a lot of other people who were against the deregulation of rent control laws at the time.
In 1997, Mr. Silver was part of a rally in front of the Capitol with a lot of other people who were against the deregulation of rent control laws at the time.

He was replaced by Gov. Eliot Spitzer in 2007, which started a long line of Democratic Party governors that is still going on today. As governors and New York City mayors came and went, Mr. Silver stayed on as mayor of New York City. Several people thought that he was the most powerful politician in the state, because he could change legislative agendas and huge budgets to his liking.

The same time, he kept making money from other sources. Finally, he was charged with steering grants to Columbia University cancer researcher Robert N. Taub in exchange for referring patients to a law firm that gave him part of its fees. That work led to his indictment and arrest, and he was charged with fraud. Another scheme had two real estate developers pay Mr. Silver the same amount of money.

In 2015, he was arrested, which caused a lot of chaos in Albany. This led to a wave of young, more progressive lawmakers, which eventually led to the Democrats taking the State Senate in 2018.

He was going to be sentenced in 2020 during the pandemic. His lawyers asked the judge to let him avoid prison and serve home confinement. They said prison would make him more likely to get sick or have the coronavirus. Judge Valerie E. Caproni of the Federal District Court in Manhattan, who was in charge of the case, turned down the request.

Letter: "Your honor, I don't want to die in prison," Mr. Silver had told the judge.

In 2003, Mr. Silver left the Bialystoker Synagogue on the Lower East Side of New York City. He was born and raised in the neighborhood. He had his bar mitzvah at the synagogue, and he lived there his whole life.
In 2003, Mr. Silver left the Bialystoker Synagogue on the Lower East Side of New York City. He was born and raised in the neighborhood. He had his bar mitzvah at the synagogue, and he lived there his whole life.
Tags

Shariff share buttons