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Q train goldman sachs employee daniel enriquez shooting, suspect hunt

Q train goldman sachs employee daniel enriquez shooting, suspect hunt
Sunday, police officers stand guard at the subway station where a man shot and killed a passenger and then ran away.
"We Need All Eyes on This," says a police officer as he searches for a gunman in a subway.

The suspect who killed a 48-year-old man on the Q train on Sunday was pictured by the police, and they asked for help to find him.

On Monday, the New York City Police Department released the first known photos of the gunman who killed a man on a Lower Manhattan subway train. The search for the suspect is still going on.

"We need all eyes on this," Police Commissioner Keechant Sewell wrote on Twitter early Monday, along with two pictures of the person they think pulled out a gun and killed an unprovoked commuter on Sunday.

Around 11:40 a.m., the suspect got on a Q train going north and shot Daniel Enriquez once in the chest. When the train doors opened at the Canal Street platform, the gunman ran away at the same time that police officers entered the station.

Mr. Enriquez, a Goldman Sachs employee from Brooklyn who was 48 years old and on his way to brunch, was rushed to Bellevue Hospital, where he later died.

Daniel Enriquez worked at Goldman Sachs and lived in Brooklyn. David Solomon, the chief executive officer of the investment bank, said that Mr. Enriquez's death "devastated" the company.
Daniel Enriquez worked at Goldman Sachs and lived in Brooklyn. David Solomon, the chief executive officer of the investment bank, said that Mr. Enriquez's death "devastated" the company.

The photos that Commissioner Sewell posted on Twitter show a man wearing a blue surgical mask, a blue hooded sweatshirt, light-colored pants, and white sneakers walking up what look like subway stairs.

She also said that police needed help "identifying and finding this man who is wanted for murder in the tragic and pointless shooting." In a statement released Monday, David Solomon, the CEO of Goldman Sachs, said that Mr. Enriquez "was a dedicated and loved member of the Goldman Sachs family for nine years."

Mr. Solomon said, "We are devastated by this senseless tragedy, and our deepest sympathies go out to Dan's family during this hard time."

The attack is the latest in a series of violent events that have happened in city subways this year. Last month, at least 23 people were hurt in a shooting, and in January, a woman died after being pushed onto the tracks in Times Square station.

Such events have been a huge problem for Mayor Eric Adams, who has promised many times to stop violence on the streets and trains of New York City.

At the Canal Street station on Monday morning, some commuters were very worried about their safety on a system that has been important to the city and its economy for a long time.

"It's really scary out there," Dominique Lachelle said as she waited for a Q train on the uptown platform where the police had tried in vain to revive Mr. Enriquez.

Ms. Lachelle, who is 29 and lives in Brooklyn and works at a hospital's front desk, said that the recent violence has changed even the smallest of her choices, like whether or not to sit down on her way to work.

"Now I stand up and go stand near the doors so that if I need to, I can escape to another car," she said. "I don't want to get in the middle of things."

Mr. Enriquez was born in Williamsburg. His parents were from Mexico, and they were the first of five children. He is the fourth person to die on a public bus or train this year.

Even though recent violence has been in the news a lot, fatal attacks on the city's public transportation are much less common than on the streets. Even though ridership is only about 60% of what it was before the coronavirus, major felony crimes on buses and trains make up only 2% of all crime in the city. This is the same number as before the pandemic.

Still, some New Yorkers at the Canal Street station on Monday said that public transportation was the only way they could afford to get to other parts of the city.

Hek Emra, 25, a concierge from Queens, said, "You can't avoid it because Uber gets expensive." "What's the matter? You can't do anything."

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