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Kathleen Folbigg diary book Australian story extracts, craig husband

Kathleen Folbigg diary book Australian story extracts, craig husband
The NSW governor has asked for an investigation into Kathleen Folbigg's convictions.
The case of Kathleen Folbigg, who was found guilty of killing her four children, will be looked into again.

Kathleen Folbigg, an Australian woman who was found guilty and sent to prison for killing her four children, will be looked into again.

Folbigg was sent to prison in 2003 after being found guilty of killing three of her young children and causing the death of a fourth.

For another six years, she won't be able to get out of her 40-year sentence early.

But a group of well-known scientists have asked for her to be let out of jail early, saying that there is no scientific proof that she smothered the children.

They say that her two daughters had a genetic disorder and that her sons had illnesses that could have made it hard for them to breathe while they slept.

Her legal team put the case forward in the form of a petition more than a year ago.

On Wednesday, Mark Speakman, the Attorney-General of New South Wales, said that her conviction would be looked into again.

The NSW attorney general, Mark Speakman, will lead the investigation.
The NSW attorney general, Mark Speakman, will lead the investigation.

Folbigg's conviction was upheld in 2019 by a separate review.

Speakman said, "I can understand why people might shake their heads and roll their eyes when they hear how many chances Ms. Folbigg has had to clear her name."

"The evidence is strong enough, in my opinion, for some kind of action to be taken."

He said that there was "enough of a question or doubt" that the new information was enough to warrant an investigation.

But he didn't go as far as to say it was enough to get a pardon.

He said, "I've told the governor that a pardon shouldn't be given because I don't think it makes sense in light of what's happened."

He said that recommending a pardon "behind closed doors" would hurt trust in the court system.

Speakman admitted that the genetic mutation was known to the 2018-2019 inquiry.

But he said there was "no completed study" of how the mutation changed the way the gene worked.

"Even though Ms. Folbigg has tried many times to clear her name, this new evidence and the fact that scientists agree with it cannot be ignored."

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