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Holly Madison short hair, secrets of playboy documentary on Netflix trailer

Holly Madison, a Playboy bunny, discloses Playboy Mansion's 'gross' sex secrets.

An ex-Playmate described the "cycle of heinous acts" she and others were forced to perform in Hugh Hefner's Playboy Mansion.

An ex-Playmate recently discussed the mental torment she through while residing in Hugh Hefner's Playboy Mansion.

"I felt like I was trapped in a loop of heinous acts and I didn't know what to do," Holly Madison, a former Playboy pin-up and ex-girlfriend of the late Hefner, says in an explosive new preview for the upcoming docuseries Secrets of Playboy.

Hefner died in 2017 of sepsis at the age of 91.

Madison, 41, reveals the mental and emotional suffering she endured as a Playmate from 2001 to 2008 in a trailer for the ten-hour documentary about the once-famous Playboy empire, which will debut on January 24, Page Six reports.

"I reached a point where I cracked under the strain of having to look exactly like everyone else," admits Madison, who starred on Ereality !'s series The Girls Next Door as one of Hef's three voluptuous lover girls.

Holly Madison short hair, secrets of playboy documentary on Netflix trailer
Hugh Hefner with co-stars Holly Madison (L) and Bridget Marquardt in 2007. (R).

Madison claims that after six months of living in the house with the other ladies, she cut her long blonde hair to increase her confidence.

However, she asserts that Hef's reaction was severe.

"When I returned with short hair, he flipped out on me," Madison explains. "He screamed at me, claiming it made me appear old, hard, and cheap."

Jonathan Baker, a friend of Madison's, confirms his accusations on the episode.

"I recall when she had her hair trimmed," Baker recalls. "He was livid about it. Indeed, his universe."

Bridget Marquardt, 48, a former Playmate and Madison's Girls Next Door co-star, says: "Hef would be quite aggressive in the way he spoke to Holly."

He flipped out when she came down with red lipstick one day, saying he despised red lipstick on girls and [told her] she needed to take it off immediately."

Hefner, according to Marquardt, never erupted when other Playmates wore red lipstick.

"It was extremely aggravating to live with on a daily basis," she recalls. "All of the drama and stress." I could tell [Madison] was despondent and sad, and her demeanor was beginning to shift."

Playboy's cover features Kendra Wilkinson, Holly Madison, and Bridget Marquardt.
Playboy's cover features Kendra Wilkinson, Holly Madison, and Bridget Marquardt.
Holly Madison, a former Playboy bunny, has spoken about the 'gross' sex secrets at the Playboy Mansion.
Holly Madison, a former Playboy bunny, has spoken about the 'gross' sex secrets at the Playboy Mansion.

Madison – who subsequently admitted that her association with Playboy was a "risk choice" – wasn't the first Playmate to experience difficulties in the house.

"Hef said he wasn't involved in any hard drug use at the estate, but it was a lie," says Hefner's ex-playmate Sondra Theodore. "Down the line, quaaludes were taken for sex," she explains, referring to the "wonderful" sensation induced by the hypnotic sedative.

"Typically, you take a half [of a Quaalude]. However, if you take two, you will pass out," Theodore, 64, explains. "There was such a seduction, and males understood that if they offered them a Quaalude, they could persuade them to do almost anything."

Hefner's former secretary and executive assistant validated Theodore's assertions about the tycoon's proclivity for drug use with females.

Madison alleges that drugs were traded in exchange for sex at the home.
Madison alleges that drugs were traded in exchange for sex at the home.

"Quaaludes were what we used to refer to as leg-spreaders. That was their entire purpose," Lisa Loving Barrett explains in the show. "They were, if you will, a necessary evil to the partying."

Barrett, who worked at the Playboy Mansion from 1977 to 1989, admits to assisting Hefner and his executive personnel in obtaining prescriptions for pharmaceuticals in order to ensure a constant supply.

"Some of our names would have prescriptions," Barrett explains. "Prescriptions were written in Sondra's name, in Hef's name, in my name, and in Mary's name... We maintained a desk calendar labeled 'Lisa's Q,' 'Hef's Q,' or 'Sandra's Q.'"

Barrett stated that the mansion's abundance of illicit narcotics "allowed four, and occasionally five, prescriptions for the same medication to feed the machine."

Secrets of Playboy will also peel back the glitzy veneer of Hefner's enterprise to reveal its inner workings.

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