Former prime minister Gordon Brown has retracted a claim Kevin Rudd

Kevin Rudd vindicated punching claim as former UK PM steps back

Former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd was vindicated for claiming that he was attempting to assault a Chinese negotiator, something he has always refuted.

After the charge was retracted, former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd was vindicated over an accusation that he threatened to punch a Chinese negotiator.

Last week in The Guardian, former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown said that Mr. Rudd had to be restrained from punching a Chinese diplomat at the Copenhagen Climate Conference in 2009, where Beijing took a hard-line approach.

Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown removed a comment that Kevin Rudd had to be stopped from striking a Chinese negotiator
Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown removed a comment that Kevin Rudd had to be stopped from striking a Chinese negotiator

Mr. Rudd discounted the story as a "urban myth," claiming he "left the shirt-fronting (former prime minister) Tony Abbott" to the Nine newspapers.

On Wednesday, when the article was amended after Mr Brown withdrew the accusation, his rejection was vindicated.

It now contains an update that reads: "An earlier edition featured Gordon Brown's reminder that at the 2009 Copenhagen summit, Kevin Rudd "had to be physically restrained from punching the Chinese negotiator.

It was stated that the Australian Prime Minister was very upset about the role of China in the climate talks, but (Mr Brown) clarified that no warning was given.

Mr Brown has previously praised Mr Rudd's success at the climate talks in The Killing Season, the 2015 ABC film.

We did not get the full treaty, (but) the fact that we got a declaration from Copenhagen, which has now contributed to the next level to be worked through this year, is thanks to him to no small degree," he said."

In the face of stubborn opposition from Beijing, Mr Rudd allegedly worked overtime at the climate summit as he sought to salvage talks.

Mr. Rudd was vindicated as a 'urban fallacy' after denying the assertion.
Mr. Rudd was vindicated as a 'urban fallacy' after denying the assertion.

The bottom line is that at a time when China was actively resisting, I was relentlessly prosecuting Australian climate interests. I don't apologise for doing this,' he told Nine Newspapers.

In a briefing to Australian journalists during the meeting, he was claimed to have described the Chinese negotiators as 'ratf—ers'.

Mr. Rudd later explained that he meant "the Chinese are trying to ratf—k us" by saying that his annoyance with Beijing was highlighted by the "colorful expression."