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The death of Kurdishtan woman Mahsa Amini, hijab definition iran strict dress code

"Death to the dictator!" cries out a group of women in Iran after Mahsa Amini's death.

Iran has seen unprecedented protests all over the country because of the death of a young Kurdish woman who died after being arrested by Iran's morality police.

A woman sits on a box in the middle of a public square and cuts her hair with a lot of force. People shout "Death to the dictator" from nearby.

In another place, an Iranian girl stands on the roof of a burning police car and chants, "We don't want Islamic Republic."

Masih Alinejad, an Iranian journalist and activist, says that the "compulsory hijab" is "the most visible sign of religious dictatorship." So, another woman burns one.

These are some of the "unprecedented" things that are happening in Iran as the country explodes over the suspicious death of a young woman who had been arrested by Tehran's notorious morality police.

Iran is violently putting down protests, so the acts of defiance are even more brave.

The fire was started by the death of 22-year-old Kurdish woman Mahsa Amini on Friday.

She died three days after being rushed to the hospital after being arrested in Tehran by the police who make sure women follow Iran's strict dress code.

The last moments of Mahsa Amini were caught on CCTV.
The last moments of Mahsa Amini were caught on CCTV.
The last second before Mahsa Amini fell.
The last second before Mahsa Amini fell.

Mahsa Amini's passing away

Mahsa Amini was caught on September 13 by the Guidance Patrol in Tehran, Iran. The Guidance Patrol is a kind of vice squad that works under the Law Enforcement Command.

She was said to have broken strict hijab rules and was accused of wearing "inappropriate clothing" because of how she wore her head covering.

She went into a coma and died three days later while she and other women in police custody were waiting. She died of a "heart attack," according to the authorities. Her father said that she was healthy, but that she got bruises on her legs while she was in jail.

Alleged eyewitnesses say that she was beaten and that her head hit the side of a police car, but Iranian officials, who have opened an investigation, have not confirmed this.

State media in Iran showed CCTV footage of the last moments of her life.

She seemed to pass out at the "re-education" center, where people go to get "counseling" about how they dress.

At a press conference on Monday, Hossein Rahimi, who is in charge of police in Greater Tehran, said, "The incident was unfortunate for us, and we hope to never see anything like it again."

He said that "false accusations" had been made against the police, and he said that she was not hurt when she was arrested or afterward.

Reports say that protesters are "not convinced" by the official explanation for her death and say she died "under torture." Leaked medical scans "clearly show a skull fracture on the right side of her head caused by a severe blow to the head," which suggests she may have died from a cerebral hemorrhage and stroke.

Mahsa Amini was laid to rest on September 17 in Kurdistan, the province where she was born.

An ambulance took her away quickly.
An ambulance took her away quickly.
Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old Kurdish woman, died a few days after the morality police took her into custody.
Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old Kurdish woman, died a few days after the morality police took her into custody.

Crackdown in Iran is causing more worry around the world

The crackdown on protests in Iran that has killed people is causing more and more worry around the world.

Even though at least three people died in protests on Monday, Iranian women and men took to the streets on Tuesday for the fourth night in a row, shouting slogans against the country's clerical leadership, according to pictures posted on social media.

The protests are some of the worst in Iran since the fuel price rises in November 2019. This time, a lot of women are taking part, which is against the strict laws of the Islamic republic. Sometimes, they even take off their headscarves and set them on fire or cut their hair as a sign of protest.

The protests started in Amini's home province of northern Kurdistan in Iran, but they have now spread to Tehran and other major cities like Rasht in the north, Bandar Abbas in the south, and Mashhad in the east.

According to the Fars news agency, the governor of Kurdistan province, Ismail Zarei Koosha, said that three people had died and that they had been "killed suspiciously" as part of "a plot by the enemy."

Activists say, however, that dozens of people have also been hurt, and they say that the security forces are to blame because they used live fire to hurt people.

Human Rights Watch, which is based in New York, said that witness accounts and videos that are going around on social media "indicate that authorities are using tear gas to break up protests and have apparently used lethal force in Kurdistan province."

The UN said that acting High Commissioner for Human Rights Nada Al-Nashif was worried about Amini's death and "the violent response by security forces to protests that followed."

She said that "Mahsa Amini's tragic death and claims of torture and mistreatment" needed to be looked into by a third party.

During a protest for Mahsa Amini, people gather around a bike that is on fire.
During a protest for Mahsa Amini, people gather around a bike that is on fire.
During a protest for Mahsa Amini, people gather around a barricade that is on fire.
During a protest for Mahsa Amini, people gather around a barricade that is on fire.

"Stop killings by the state."

The Norwegian-based Kurdish human rights group Hengaw said it had confirmed three deaths in Kurdistan province, one each in the towns of Divandareh, Saqqez, and Dehglan.

It also said that in the Kurdistan region, where there was a general strike on Monday, 221 people had been hurt and 250 others had been arrested.

It also said that a 10-year-old girl, whose bloody body has gone viral on social media, was hurt but still alive in the town of Bukan.

Images shared on social media show that protesters and security forces are fighting hard, especially in the town of Divandareh. The sounds of live fire can be heard.

Tuesday, images showed that protests were still going on in Kurdistan, around Tehran's main universities, and, in a rare move, at the Tehran bazaar.

People shouted things like "Death to the dictator" and "Woman, life, freedom" as they set fires and tried to turn over police cars in a number of cities.

Jake Sullivan, the US national security advisor, said, "It doesn't surprise us that people from all walks of life in Iran are coming out to protest this and say that this is not the kind of society they want to live in."

Mahmood Amiry-Moghaddam, who runs the Norway-based Iran Human Rights (IHR) NGO, said that countries with diplomatic ties to Iran must "stop more state killings by supporting the people's calls to realize their basic rights."

During a protest in Istanbul, Turkey, a person holds up a picture of Mahsa Amini.
During a protest in Istanbul, Turkey, a person holds up a picture of Mahsa Amini.
On September 18, 2022, a kiosk in Tehran, the capital of Iran, sells newspapers with photos and articles about Mahsa Amini on the front pages.
On September 18, 2022, a kiosk in Tehran, the capital of Iran, sells newspapers with photos and articles about Mahsa Amini on the front pages.
Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old Kurdish woman, died a few days after the morality police took her into custody.
Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old Kurdish woman, died a few days after the morality police took her into custody.
"Systemic punishment"

The IHR said that security forces used batons, tear gas, water cannons, rubber bullets, and live ammunition in some areas "to directly target protesters and stop the protests."

During protests on Monday, Netblocks, a company that tracks internet access, saw that the internet was down for more than three hours in Kurdistan province and in parts of Tehran and other cities.

The situation will put more pressure on Iran's President Ebrahim Raisi, who is in New York this week for the UN General Assembly. He was already going to get a lot of attention for Iran's poor human rights record.

Tuesday, French President Emmanuel Macron met with Raisi for a rare meeting to try one last time to reach a deal that would bring back the 2015 nuclear accord.

Since the Islamic revolution in 1979, which got rid of the shah, all women in Iran have had to wear the Islamic headscarf in public.

The rules are enforced by a group of police called the Gasht-e Ershad, which means "guidance patrol." They can arrest women who break the dress code, but most of the time they just give them a warning.

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