Brandon Mitchell Juror in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin

A juror in the Derek Chauvin trial said that the experience was similar to 'seeing someone die every day.'

A member of the jury that convicted former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin of murdering George Floyd testified that the trial felt like "making someone die every day" — and that Chauvin exhibited no guilt.

Brandon Mitchell, 32 — juror 52 in the case that garnered international attention — told CNN that the courtroom environment was "just dim."

“Every day felt like a funeral and watching someone die,” Mitchell told the network. “Every day was tense. Although I was not anxious, it was stressful. It was a tremendous amount of pressure.”

Mitchell, a basketball coach, is the first juror to talk openly about his experience during the trial.

Lisa Christensen, an alternate juror, shared her story last week.

Mitchell remembered Chauvin being optimistic at first, but that began to change as the testimony progressed.

Derek Chauvin (second from left) kneels with other police officers in front of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 25, 2020.
Derek Chauvin (second from left) kneels with other police officers in front of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 25, 2020.

“When the case progressed, his attitude took on a more puzzled tone, as this is not how it is meant to go,” he said.

“I saw no remorse.”

He did, however, disclose that one juror was initially skeptical of the former officer's guilt — and that the majority of the more than ten hours of deliberations were spent debating with that one juror.

According to Mitchell, the prosecution's best moment came during Dr. Martin Tobin's testimony, in which he described "the moment the light goes out in [Floyd's] body."

“When Dr. Tobin concluded his testimony, I felt as if the trial was over,” Mitchell told CNN. “He explained it in plain language, and it made sense.”

Chauvin, 45, was eventually found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter. On the most serious allegation, he faces up to 40 years in prison.

The ex-sentencing cop's was originally scheduled for June 16, but was pushed back to June 25 this week due to a "scheduling dispute," WCCO-TV announced.

The jury deliberated for more than ten hours over two days before reaching a verdict in the closely watched case arising from Floyd's death on May 25, 2020 — which sparked global demonstrations against police brutality and racial inequality.

Chauvin pressed his knee to the back of Floyd's neck for more than 9 minutes, prompting cries from bystanders to release him.

Derek Chauvin is handcuffed after his conviction in the assassination of George Floyd on April 20, 2021.
Derek Chauvin is handcuffed after his conviction in the assassination of George Floyd on April 20, 2021.

Mitchell, who first disclosed his jury experience to Grammy Award-winning gospel artist Erica Campbell, stated in his jury questionnaire that he chose to serve on this case "because of all the protests and all that occurred after the incident."

“This is the most momentous case of my lifetime, and I would relish the opportunity to be a part of it,” he wrote.

Mitchell chose to talk despite Judge Peter Cahill's Friday order prohibiting the release of juror names for at least six months due to the barrage of media coverage and the "unprecedented" volume of emails attorneys described receiving that are "frequently incendiary, inflammatory, and intimidating in nature," CNN reports.

Mitchell told the broadcaster that he has taken time to unwind after the jury's decision.

“Now that it's been a few days, I'm beginning to feel myself again,” he said.

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