Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

BLM mansion Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza and Melina Abdullah

BLM mansion Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza and Melina Abdullah
Melina Abdullah and two other Black Lives Matter leaders are said to have bought a $6 million home in Southern California with money that was given to them.
In Southern California, Black Lives Matter bought a $6 million home with money from people who want to help.

On Monday, a report said that Black Lives Matter bought a swanky Southern California home for almost $6 million with money that people had given them.

New York magazine says that three leaders of the social justice movement made a video last June outside the "secretly bought" home to commemorate the first anniversary of George Floyd's death.

Cullors said at the time that she had been out of "survival mode" for a few weeks after the New York Post broke the story that she bought four high-end homes in the United States for $3.2 million in April.

Patrisse Cullors resigned in May because people were upset that she bought expensive real estate.
Patrisse Cullors resigned in May because people were upset that she bought expensive real estate.

Asked why the right-wing media was attacking her group, Cullors said: "Because we're powerful and we are winning." Is because we are a threat to the established order. We are also putting white supremacy in danger.

But Cullors and her coworkers didn't say anything about the 6,500-square-foot home behind them in the video. It had more than six bedrooms and bathrooms, fireplaces, a pool, and parking for more than 20 cars, according to the magazine.

When the Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation got money from people, they bought the property in October 2020 with the money.

There were three leaders in the social justice movement who made a video last June outside the home of George Floyd. They were there to remember the one-year anniversary of his death.
There were three leaders in the social justice movement who made a video last June outside the home of George Floyd. They were there to remember the one-year anniversary of his death.

The seven-bedroom house was bought by a man named Dyane Pascall two weeks after BLMGNF received $66.5 million from its fiscal sponsor earlier this month. Pascall bought the house. A company run by Cullors and her husband, Janaya Khan, has a financial manager named Pascall, New York Magazine says.

Ownership was transferred to an LLC in Delaware in less than a week, which meant that the property's owner wouldn't be named, according to the report.

Cullors, BLM's co-founder, resigned as the group's executive director in May after the group bought three homes in the Los Angeles area and one outside of Atlanta. This caused a lot of people to be angry.

According to the report, the BLM tried to hide the fact that the nearly $6 million home had been bought from a journalist who was looking into the deal.

The organization tried to "kill" the story about the home, which is called the "campus" inside the company. One strategy memo reportedly said it could be used as a "influencer house," where artists can meet.

The Black Joy Creators Fellowship board member Shalomyah Bowers told the magazine on Friday that the board bought the house with the intention of using it as "housing and studio space" for the recipients of the fellowship. The house was bought with that in mind.

The foundation "always planned" to show the home's legal documents this May, Bowers said. Bowers said the home doesn't serve as anyone's home.

Statement: But it didn't say why there wasn't a lot of content made there for 17 months, which is what the report said.

According to the report, the BLM tried to hide the fact that the nearly $6 million home had been bought from a journalist who was looking into the deal.
According to the report, the BLM tried to hide the fact that the nearly $6 million home had been bought from a journalist who was looking into the deal.

One expert in nonprofit organizations said that because the deal was so big, BLM might get more attention for not being very open.

Jacob Harold, a co-founder of Candid, said, "That's a very good point." I don't think what you're doing is illegal or even morally wrong; it might just be strategic, though.

A service that tracks US nonprofits was made by Harold, who helped make it happen. He thought about whether the money could have been better spent somewhere else.

Home: The 6,500 square-foot home is said to have more than six bedrooms and bathrooms, a swimming pool, and a lot of room to park a lot of cars.
Home: The 6,500 square-foot home is said to have more than six bedrooms and bathrooms, a swimming pool, and a lot of room to park a lot of cars.
One of the people who works for the Black Joy Creators Fellowship said the home was bought with the goal of using it as "housing and studio space."
One of the people who works for the Black Joy Creators Fellowship said the home was bought with the goal of using it as "housing and studio space."
The BLM said that the house was not meant to be used as a personal home.
The BLM said that the house was not meant to be used as a personal home.

"Why aren't you spending your money on policy or, you know, other ways that an organization could deal with the main problems with Black Lives Matter?" What did Harold say?

The land was bought to help the Bureau of Land Management do its job, as well as for any other uses that might be needed, Bowers said in a statement to the New York Post on Monday.

"The organization has always planned to include the property on the 990 that is due May 15th as part of BLMGNF's ongoing transparency efforts," Bowers said. In the past, BLMGNF has and still does use the space for leadership off-sites and programming. The property isn't used as a home by anyone.

When he learned about the "complex" in California, one activist in Missouri said he was shocked and sad at the same time.

Activist Tory Russell told New York Magazine, "It's a waste of time and money."

Tags

Shariff share buttons