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Australian federal election early voting centres 2022, locations near me

Australian federal election early voting centres 2022, locations near me
Scott Morrison, the prime minister of Australia, talks with Andrew Constance, a Liberal candidate for Gilmore and a former state minister in New South Wales.
Before the PM starts his campaign, more than 1.2 million Australians vote early.

8.1% of Queensland voters, or more than 280,000 people, have already voted in the federal election for 2022. This is happening as Prime Minister Scott Morrison arrives in Brisbane to officially launch the LNP's campaign.

That's more than twice as many people as voted early in Queensland at the last federal election in 2019, and one political expert says the Coalition made a mistake by starting their campaign after early voting started.

Since the last federal election in 2019, the number of early voters in Australia has doubled, from 511,260 in 2019 to 1,273,694 in 2022.

Dr. Paul Williams, a political expert at Griffith University, said that the LNP made a mistake by holding their launch after early voting had started, and that it may be "too late" for the LNP to change the polling trends that show Labor will win.

As he talks to the media on Fitzroy Island in May 2022, Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese is worried about a late swing to the LNP.
As he talks to the media on Fitzroy Island in May 2022, Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese is worried about a late swing to the LNP.

Williams said, "Today, election campaigns try to win over 20% to 30% of voters who are on the fence."

"He might have a great offer he's going to drop on the voters, but he's already lost 1.2 million voters, which I think is a mistake in a close election."

Even though Queensland switched to the LNP late in 2019, Williams said that the Coalition's late start to the campaign was not a good thing.

"But yes. No more time. Williams said, "I think it was a mistake for the Coalition not to start their campaign before pre-polling began."

He said that Australians "fell in love" with voting before the polls.

"Aussies are committed to making voting mandatory. They know it's important, but they don't like the process and don't want to talk to each other, Williams said.

Larissa Waters, a senator for the Green Party in Queensland, said that the party had a "great chance" of winning three seats in the center of Brisbane.
Larissa Waters, a senator for the Green Party in Queensland, said that the party had a "great chance" of winning three seats in the center of Brisbane.

Figures from the Australian Electoral Commission show that in 2022, twice as many people across Australia have voted early as they did in 2019.

As early voting started around Australia this week, almost 1.3 million of the 17.2 million people who are registered to vote have already done so.

That's the same as 7.39%.

8.13 percent, or 284,969, of Queensland's 3,503,609 registered voters have already voted.

At the Queensland council elections in March 2020, more than a million people voted before polling day. This shows that early voting is becoming more and more popular.

Also, Queensland has a higher percentage of mail-in votes, which account for almost a quarter of all votes counted and are very important in close races.

In the federal seat of Brisbane, which is held by Trevor Evans of the LNP, 25,913 people have registered to vote by mail. This is almost 20% of the 125,241 people who are registered to vote.

Early voting begins in Australia federal election

More than one-third (9174, or 35.4%) of those who can vote by mail have already done so.

Griffith is a close Labor seat held by Terri Butler. There are 121,277 registered voters there, and 22,418 of them (or 18.5%) vote by mail. About 37% of them have already cast their vote.

As an example, about 10.6% of votes are sent in by mail in Morrison's electorate (Cook), and about 12.3% of votes are sent in by mail in the seat of opposition leader Anthony Albanese (Grayndler).

The Greens also filed a complaint with the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) on Friday, which the AEC confirmed. The Greens say that in three places in Brisbane, Labor election materials say falsely that "only a vote for Labor can change the government."

Larissa Waters, a senator for the Greens in Queensland, said that it is "very disappointing to see the ALP say falsely that the only way to change the government is to vote 1 Labor."

"This is clearly not true, and I've asked the AEC to decide if this is a form of disinformation."

Different studies show that between 70% and 82% of Greens' votes go to Labor candidates.

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